Dope and Denial, More Than a “Step Slow.”

Posted: May 29, 2016 in AVC Men's Basketball, AVC Men's BB 2016-17, Dope
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This is the time of the year that reminds me of my time in the military.  I was older than most of my fellow soldiers during the my active duty stint as I had just finished college when I joined the Army and finished officers training. 

I learned a lot in the military, especially during my year in Viet Nam.  The only thing I am going to mention today is about marijuana use in Nam and what it did to the soldiers.

To begin with, a “stick” of dope was 0.15 cents.  Nearly free.  The young soldiers that rotated to Viet Nam were nervous, excited and believe it or not, wanting to learn.  Best guess on my part was about 1/3 of the soldiers that worked for me started using dope after they set up their “short-timers calendars.” 

The thing I noticed was that “users” became less and less effective as soldiers the longer they smoked dope.  They had difficulty learning, and their motivation was depressed.  I didn’t know at the time what dope does to you and your kids like we do now.  The irony today is users know and still smoke dope.  Talk about being in denial.


The latest data shows that when you smoke dope you will get cancer and you will get to watch your kids suffer and die young of cancer too.  Cannabis….great stuff!    And people wonder why health care costs so much. 


Smoking cannabis ALTERS your DNA ‘triggering serious illness’ 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk


  • Smoking cannabis alters a person’s DNA, causing mutations, experts say
  • These mutations can trigger serious illness, including cancer
  • Mutations passed to children and future generations, raising their risk too

    Smoking cannabis can alter a person’s DNA, causing mutations that expose a user to serious illnesses, experts have warned.

    Furthermore, the heightened risk is not exclusive to the marijuana user, a study has shown.

    The disease-causing mutations are passed on to their children, and several future generations, it has emerged.

    Though the link between cannabis and severe illnesses, such as cancer, has previously been documented, how this occurs and the implications for future generations was not well understood.

    Smoking cannabis can alter a person's DNA, causing mutations that expose a user to serious illnesses, experts have warned. The disease-causing mutations are passed on to their children, and several future generations, they said

    Smoking cannabis can alter a person’s DNA, causing mutations that expose a user to serious illnesses, experts have warned. The disease-causing mutations are passed on to their children, and several future generations, they said

    Dr Stuart Reece, and Professor Gary Hulse from the University of Western Australia’s School of Psychiatry, analyzed literary and research material to understand the likely causes.

    Dr Reece said: ‘Through our research we found that cancers and illnesses were likely caused by cell mutations resulting from cannabis properties having a chemical interaction with a person’s DNA.

    ‘With cannabis use increasing globally in recent years, this has a concerning impact for the population.’

    While a person may appear healthy and lead a normal life, the unseen damage to their DNA could also be passed on to their children, and cause illness for several generations to come.

    ‘Even if a mother has never used cannabis in her life, the mutations passed on by a father’s sperm can cause serious and fatal illnesses in their children,’ Dr Reece said.

    ‘The parents may not realise that they are carrying these mutations, which can lie dormant and may only affect generations down the track, which is the most alarming aspect.’

    Dr Stuart Reece said: 'Through our research we found that cancers and illnesses were likely caused by cell mutations resulting from cannabis properties having a chemical interaction with a person's DNA'

    Dr Stuart Reece said: ‘Through our research we found that cancers and illnesses were likely caused by cell mutations resulting from cannabis properties having a chemical interaction with a person’s DNA’

    Dr Reece said that when the chemicals in cannabis altered a user’s DNA structure it could lead to slow cell growth and have serious implications for the fetal development of babies, potentially causing limbs or vital organs not to develop properly or cause cancers.

    He said: ‘The worst cancers are reported in the first few years of life in children exposed in utero to cannabis effects.’

    Dr Reece said the finding was of major importance due to the fact cannabis use is increasing in many nations around the world, as many countries begin to legalize its use.

    ‘Some people may say that previous data collected doesn’t show there are serious effects from using cannabis, but many authorities acknowledge that there is now a much larger consumption of cannabis use compared to previous years,’ he added.

    The study carries implications for researchers, medical health professionals and governments in regulating drug use and protecting those who are most vulnerable.

    The research has been published in the journal Mutation Research – Fundamental and Molecular Mechanisms of Mutagenesis.

     

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